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Spacecowboy1979

Author Topic: Wagon Rear Shocks  (Read 515 times)

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Offline flash041

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Wagon Rear Shocks
« on: October 03, 2018, 09:40:20 PM »
I was in need of new rear shocks for my 78 wagon. As you may know they are not available any more. I tried to find something close, with the same mountings. I found late 70's Camaro's rear shocks have the same mounts, but about 2 1/2 inches longer. I measured about 7 inches to the axle bump stop with suspension at rest hanging. The shocks have 8.25 inches of travel. the original shocks are about an inch short whit suspension at rest. So by my calculations the shock should bottom out about the same time as the bump stop. When installing them I attached the bottom first, then used a ratchet strap to pull and compress the shock into place. The part number for the coil-overs in Monroe #58551.
1978 Pinto Cruising wagon (I am the original owner ! ) Built Aug 15th 1977 in NJ
1993 Mustang LX 2.3 convertible

Offline Wittsend

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Re: Wagon Rear Shocks
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2018, 10:29:12 AM »
Great information.


 I used regular (sedan) Pinto shocks on my wagon. Because the threaded portion is so long I was able to slide a thick wall tube over it. Ironically the early Pinto's have a similar pin type mount on the shock top as on the bottom, not the crossbar type in your picture. Lacking additional thick wall tubing I then stacked extra cupped washers on the top end to place the shock closer to its "travel range." So, either way the thick wall tubing, or stacked washers, you get the same results because the spacing places the shock very near its normal operating position. I was able to compensate for 1-1/2" of the 2" difference in the shocks. Note I did this to the "inside" sections.  6+ years and so far so good. But I do caution that one does this "at their own risk."