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Offline Greymare

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Lowering Block
« on: April 21, 2015, 04:21:23 AM »
I am trying to lower the back of my 76 Pinto wagon. I did some searching here and only really found a mention of Racers Walsh as a source for blocks. The only ones I see they have are 1.5" and I am wanting at least a 2" drop. I have already purchase the spindles for the front which I will be installing next week when I get home. I know the car already had some rack to it and didn't want it to be more. I wish had pulled the axle down now because I have no idea what the spring perch looks like to see if some of the general lowering blocks would work. Can any of you help me out here?
Thanks in advance!

Offline Wittsend

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2015, 10:25:18 AM »
Do you have a 6-3/4" or an 8". I'm not sure that it matters, but it might. Since the 8" was used in Pinto's, Mustangs, Mavericks/Comet, Falcon and other Ford product I can't help but thing there is a general block that will work.

If not, I'd try a 4X4 shop and see what is available. If you ask by application likely everyone will say they have nothing. If you ask by specs. of the block (height, length width) and U-Bolt diameter, U-spacing and length you will probably be a lot more successful.  Typically  I just go to the junk yard and find U-bolts that will work. Then I find something suitable for the block. Normally it will require drilling a hole and creating a protrusion.  I've used very thick walled rectangular tubing. The locator hole is easy enough to drill and the protrusion is often a bolt with the head turned in a lathe or just filed while spinning in a drill press.

Lastly my '73 wagon is at normal ride height with 175-70-13" tire (typical for the Pinto). While the adapted Turbo Coupe exhaust drops about an inch lower than idea,l I'd think that a 2" drop is going to have you scraping the ground often unless you are running taller tires to compensate.


Offline Greymare

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2015, 08:45:54 PM »
Wittsend,
Thanks for the reply. I haven't measured it but I am pretty sure it is the 6-3/4". It looks much smaller than all the 7.5 and 8.8s I have dealt with in the pass. I looked around to see if I could find the dimensions of the spring perch and had no luck. I am at a disadvantage as I am out of town right now and can't just measure the ones on the car. I had hoped to be able to buy something while I was here and have it waiting at home for me next week to install. I have some time tonight and will see what else I can come up with.

Yeah I have found that when you tell them its for a Pinto you either get a laugh or a "oh cool!" Then you get the yeah we don't have that and you have to tell them to try and look it up for something else. It seems that our poor little Pintos have been forgotten in the past and left to die. Perfect example are front brake pads. None of the local parts stores can even get the pads for it. Lucky enough we have the internet to help keep them alive!

I haven't done all the measurements and have not picked out a rim and tire size yet. For the short term I am going to run the stock size wheel and tire. The ones that are on mine are the 14" tire though. Once I get the lowering blocks and spindles installed I plan to measure to see exactly how big I can go. I want a fat tire in the back as well as have it tucked a little if possible. I know I am at least going with 15"s and possible a staggered 15" on front with 16" in the rear. The caps I will be running on the 14 black steel wheel are just the dog dish centers. I think the look better than the full hub caps I already had.
I haven't made up my mind on which wheel I will be going with but I am torn between the Vintage and the Rallye from http://www.thewheelsmith.net/index.html  I love the 47 Ford center but think the 46 Ford Plain will look better on this setup. Maybe even the 42 Ford. I guess the short answer is yes I will be running a taller tire so scraping shouldn't be as big of an issue. Although after driving my 04 Cobra that was lowered way to low to work I know all the places to avoid. LOL 

Offline Wittsend

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2015, 11:02:06 AM »
Whatever you do, just be careful. Any modifications you do, you do at your own risk. And I'll add those riding with you and bystanders in the event of a part failure.

Offline Pinto5.0

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2015, 04:00:34 PM »
Pinto's have those thick rubber spring isolators & the axle pads have a big oval cut out to align the rubber & perch. I have actual Pinto lowering blocks from the 80's that have that matching oval in the block. Running generic blocks with 1/2" pins will require some work & welding to keep everything in it's proper place.
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Offline Greymare

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2015, 10:48:30 PM »
Whatever you do, just be careful. Any modifications you do, you do at your own risk. And I'll add those riding with you and bystanders in the event of a part failure.

Yes Sir I understand that. I would abort before I did something that might be dangerous to me or anyone. I built my 850 RWHP mustang with a full engine and interior swap. Safety was always the most important thing. I would hope with this 95 HP beast I can manage to keep her together.


Pinto's have those thick rubber spring isolators & the axle pads have a big oval cut out to align the rubber & perch. I have actual Pinto lowering blocks from the 80's that have that matching oval in the block. Running generic blocks with 1/2" pins will require some work & welding to keep everything in it's proper place.


I am hoping that I can find some that will work. I thought I was reading somewhere that when you install the blocks you basically removed the rubber. The article was talking about how the blocks helped with wheel hop. (Not that I am remotely worried about having wheel hop.) This is all being said with the reminder I haven't pulled it apart and have not true answer as to how it was put together. As soon I as I get home I plan to disassemble it and  then I will have a clearer picture of what I am working with. I have access to a CNC plasma machine as well as having a few 8.8 rear ends laying around. Its not beyond me to build some perches with the 2"s added to them and chop up one of the 8.8's I have. That would allow me to narrow the rear end and have a deeper dish wheel in the rear. I really don't want to go to that extreme with this project though. Do you have some pictures of the pinto blocks you have?

Offline TIGGER

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2015, 07:22:03 PM »
Do you have some pictures of the pinto blocks you have?

Here is the thread of the cruising wagon I had.  Down part way on this page there is a picture of the Racer Walsh blocks I used to lower the car.

http://www.fordpinto.com/index.php?topic=5292.60
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Offline Reeves1

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2015, 03:17:15 AM »
Curious - when you lads do this , do you check your pinion angles again to see if the numbers add up correctly ?

Offline Bigtimmay

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2015, 06:28:38 AM »
Yes Sir I understand that. I would abort before I did something that might be dangerous to me or anyone. I built my 850 RWHP mustang with a full engine and interior swap. Safety was always the most important thing. I would hope with this 95 HP beast I can manage to keep her together.

 

I am hoping that I can find some that will work. I thought I was reading somewhere that when you install the blocks you basically removed the rubber. The article was talking about how the blocks helped with wheel hop. (Not that I am remotely worried about having wheel hop.) This is all being said with the reminder I haven't pulled it apart and have not true answer as to how it was put together. As soon I as I get home I plan to disassemble it and  then I will have a clearer picture of what I am working with. I have access to a CNC plasma machine as well as having a few 8.8 rear ends laying around. Its not beyond me to build some perches with the 2"s added to them and chop up one of the 8.8's I have. That would allow me to narrow the rear end and have a deeper dish wheel in the rear. I really don't want to go to that extreme with this project though. Do you have some pictures of the pinto blocks you have?

You cant go any wider on the tire then you can with a stock width axle unless you plan on inboarding the springs and mini tubbing it. Also easy way to know if you have a 6 3/4 or and 8inch is look at the back if it has a diff cover like a 7.5 or 8.8 its the 6 3/4 if its solid like a 9 inch with bolts on the front side its an 8 inch.
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Offline 71HANTO

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2015, 09:37:12 AM »
One alternative to consider...I started out with lowering blocks on my road racing pinto but ultimately removed them and had my rear springs de-arched 2.5 inches by a shop near me. It saves a small amount of un-sprung weight and in theory helps with deflection or twist at the front and rear mounting bushings during hard cornering (mine are full polyurethane which helps also).

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Offline Srt

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2015, 10:07:58 PM »
I 2nd Charles post about the dearched springs. I had mine 're done by a veteran scca Alfa racer who conveniently ran a spring manufacturing  company.
He took my car for a week and drove it all over including the track at riverside.
He built me a pair of mono-leaf rear springs that truly made the car 'work'.
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Offline dick1172762

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Re: Lowering Block
« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2015, 06:56:52 PM »
3 inches of free arch as measured through the spring eyes with no weight on the spring will be perfect for a boy racer.
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