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Offline dennisofaz

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Areostar driveshaft
« on: November 01, 2016, 05:13:42 PM »
I have a 74 Runabout with a 2.3/c-4 combo and i need a new driveshaft.  I have head that an 4WD Areostar driveshaft will work but i need to know what years and which shaft, front or rear. is used.  Thank you!


Dennis

Offline Wittsend

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Re: Areostar driveshaft
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2016, 07:17:43 PM »
Another determining factor is (or at least could be) the rear end.  Do you have a 6-3/4" or an 8 " ? The length from the centerline of the axle to the pinion yoke centerline might vary between the two.

I do know this for certainty. I went from a 6-3/4" rear / C-4 trans to a 8" rear / T-5 trans and the original 45-1/2" driveshaft fit perfectly. So, I swapped out both parts and whatever differences there were..., they were either identical..., or offsetting.

Offline oldkayaker

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Re: Areostar driveshaft
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2016, 06:03:59 AM »
The Aerostar drive shaft being talked about for the Pinto with a T5 is from the 96-97 4WD Aerostar per the link below, see Bigtammy post.
http://www.fordpinto.com/index.php?topic=18779.msg118887#msg118887

The Aerostar drive shaft may be too long when used with a 8.8" rear per this link by JohnW.
http://www.fordpinto.com/index.php?topic=24959.msg152749#msg152749
Jerry J - Jupiter, Florida

Offline Wittsend

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Re: Areostar driveshaft
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2016, 09:49:32 AM »
Just curious how prevalent  the 4WD Aerostar was?  They were only made in two years in 96-97 cars (per Old Kayaker) and are basically 20 years old.  So, you have a limited production model (4WD), made in a limited year range (96-97) that are 20 years old, and probably more likely to have been sold in a corrosive climate. How many would still be around?   At least here is So. Cal. I have never seen one.

What is wrong with the original driveshaft you have? Can it be repaired?  Maybe I'm wrong, but I'd think you would be better off trying to find a Pinto driveshaft than the limited Aerostar shaft. And, it may be other shafts would fit too.  I've noticed with certain parts like driveshafts, fans and the like someone finds a replacement and everyone runs with that part. However, it may be that there are other cars that also provide what is needed. Intrigue and a tape measure might be all that is missing.

Offline dick1172762

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Re: Areostar driveshaft
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2016, 01:09:44 PM »
I'll second what Wittsend said. Aerostar driveshaft on a Pinto sounds like more lipstick on a pig. The trick of the week? I think not. It is now almost impossible to find a 20 year old any car in the junk yards. Spend your time and money on something that would really help your Pinto. Or send it($$)to me to use on my Pinto.
Its better to be a has-been, than a never was.

Offline dennisofaz

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Re: Areostar driveshaft
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2016, 04:52:09 PM »
Thanks for the help!  [size=78%]My Pinto started out with a 2.3/ C-3 combo and I changed ito a 2.3/ C-4, and purchased a driveshaft from a club member that turned out a little short, so i need to have the existing one reworked or find a the correct replacement.  My car is my daily driver so i was hoping to be able to find a driveshaft that i could swap out with out the down time.  I guess I'll just have to get a ride for a day or two and have the existing driveshaft reworked.[/size]

[size=78%]Dennis[/size]

Offline Wittsend

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Re: Areostar driveshaft
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2016, 06:07:41 PM »
And, you still may be able. We know you have the C-4 but what rear end do you have? The 6-3/4" or the 8"?  The 6-3/4" would have bolts holding on the back cover plate. The 8" does not. Its cover is welded on and the gears only accessible by removing the whole center section. Knowing the rearend you have will help others to know if they have a shaft that will fit.  You can also measure the center to center of the front and rear U-Joints and how short the shaft you have is to come up with a proper total.
 Remember that a rear end in full droop will result in the shaft sliding rearward from the trans. So, you can't measure with the car jacked up.  The general rule I've heard is that with the car at full suspension rest the driveshaft should have about one inch forward travel.  Thus, if you slide the yoke into the trans all the way, then slide it out 1" and measure from the front U-Joint centerline to the rear yoke centerline you should get the needed length.

If it is any encouragement I have a '64 Studebaker that I swapped in a GM 700R4 trans.  While it took sliding under a number of cars (oh, the thrill of the hunt) a '78 Buick 4 door Skylark provided the exact sized, bolt-in driveshaft that I needed for under $20 at Pick Your Part. So, maybe there is a C-4 splined yoke/driveshaft out there of the proper length and U-joint size.

I an curious. You had a C-3 Pinto driveshaft and it was to small/large with the C-4???  You acquired another Pinto driveshaft that is too small.  The Pinto wheelbase never changed, they used the C-3, C-4 and the 4 speed manual and the 6-3/4" and 8" rearends. Did they have six (3X2=6) different driveshaft lengths???

Offline dennisofaz

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Re: Areostar driveshaft
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2016, 02:38:25 PM »
Hi Wittsend,

I have a 6 3/4" rear now, and I also have an MII 8" and they both haf the same offset from the axel center to the yoke. 

When i removed the C-3 trans and driveshaft the difference in length to the one i purchased was a lot, with the C-3 driveshaft being longer.  I will take out the C-4 DS and have it made longer.

Dennis



Offline Wittsend

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Re: Areostar driveshaft
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2016, 05:30:47 PM »
If the C-3 shaft is too long and the yoke fits the C-4 from what I've heard it is better to shorten a too long shaft than lengthen a too short shaft.  On one of the Saturday car shows a few years back they actually shortened a shaft themselves. They scribed the U-Joint attachment and the shaft past the point they were shortening it to. That way they kept the things in alignment. They then cut the shaft with a large plumber's tubing cutter, cut the welds out of the U-Joint attachment (to free it), lined up the scribe marks and then re-welded it.   I don't recall the balance weights being in the way, but I'd assume one could scribe them too and moved then down the shaft.  Here is a You Tube search for many to pick from. https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+shorten+a+driveshaft  just something to ponder if cash is an issue.

Regarding the 6-3/4" and 8" axle to yoke distance, maybe Ford just used the appropriate depth yoke to make up any differences and thus they are the same???  IF (capital "IF") that is the case then I'd assume a 45-1/2" shaft is what you need as my C-4, 6-3/4" rearend shaft measured that. And as I stated above it worked out with the T-5 and 8" too.