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Offline Pinto1975

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1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« on: October 02, 2019, 06:45:03 PM »
Attached: 1975 Pinto window sticker. Custom ordered by me from local Ford dealer.

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Offline PBPinto

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2019, 07:45:54 PM »
Sweet, very cool to have.

Paul
Cherry Bomb
1978 Pinto Wagon
Bought with 22,230 original miles
Original: 2.3L - C3 Automatic - 6.75" Open Rear
Current: 8" 3:55 Limited Slip
Coming Soon: 302 - C4 Automatic

Caretaker: Paul B.

Offline Henrius

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2020, 08:33:28 AM »
Wow! I realize the car was optioned out, but the Pinto had increased in price a lot by 1975. I thought our high inflation came later. Quite a change from when the car started out at a little over $2000.
1973 Pinto Runabout with upgraded 2.0 liter & 4 speed, and factory sunroof. My first car, now restored, and better than it was when it rolled off the assembly line!

Offline dga57

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2020, 09:00:24 AM »
Wow! I realize the car was optioned out, but the Pinto had increased in price a lot by 1975. I thought our high inflation came later. Quite a change from when the car started out at a little over $2000.

That sticker indicates a Runabout with just about every option you could buy except air conditioning and automatic transmission!  Definitely NOT your run-of-the-mill Pinto!  I bought a 1974 Runabout new that was equipped essentially the same but did not have the Sport Appearance Package or sunroof.  If memory serves me correctly, it stickered for just under $3300 (that window sticker is long gone) but I bought it for $2900 straight out, no trade.  Hard to imagine buying a brand new car for that paltry sum but I have some old Saturday Evening Posts from 1947 that advertise a new Plymouth Special Deluxe for less than $900.  How times have changed!  My current car and pickup truck stickered for $63810 and $64980 respectively.  That would have seemed unfathomable in 1974!

Dwayne :)
Pinto Car Club of America - Serving the Ford Pinto enthusiast since 1999.

Offline Wittsend

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2020, 11:54:11 AM »
If you notice at the bottom (in the blue area) there is a list of the car models Ford sells. What is an "Elite?" I completely recall all the other cars listed but have never heard of an Elite.  That said it is odd that they list "Ford" as though it is a model (not a brand) too.

Offline dga57

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2020, 04:55:09 PM »
The Elite was Ford's entry into the mid-size personal luxury coupe line-up, squarely facing off with Chevy's Monte Carlo, Chrysler's Cordoba, etc.  By today's standards, there was nothing mid-sized about them, but in comparison to the mid-seventies' Continental Mark IV and Cadillac Eldorado they offered a lot of style in a smaller, less expensive, more maneuverable car.  The Elite began as an upscale Torino and ultimately morphed into the the downsized Thunderbird of the late 1970's.  It was actually a rather handsome car: long hood, short trunk, prominent grill, and distinctive opera windows.
My personal opinion however, was that it still rode like a Torino. 


Dwayne :)
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Offline Wittsend

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2020, 05:55:15 PM »
Thanks. I did a little looking around. As best I saw there was the Gran Torino Elite in 1974 and then the car was just called the Elite in '75 and 76.' It was referred to as a "placeholder car."  So, three years of the car and year one it had a split name with Elite as an add on name to Gran Torino.

 Interesting how that one slipped by me, we learn something new every day. Then again I was into Datsun 510's post high school (mid 70's) and wouldn't be caught dead in something Barnaby Jones would have been driving. LOL

Offline Henrius

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2020, 08:42:22 PM »
That sticker indicates a Runabout with just about every option you could buy except air conditioning and automatic transmission!  Definitely NOT your run-of-the-mill Pinto!  I bought a 1974 Runabout new that was equipped essentially the same but did not have the Sport Appearance Package or sunroof.  If memory serves me correctly, it stickered for just under $3300 (that window sticker is long gone) but I bought it for $2900 straight out, no trade.  Hard to imagine buying a brand new car for that paltry sum but I have some old Saturday Evening Posts from 1947 that advertise a new Plymouth Special Deluxe for less than $900.  How times have changed!  My current car and pickup truck stickered for $63810 and $64980 respectively.  That would have seemed unfathomable in 1974!
Dwayne :)

What you are missing is the debasement of fiat money over that time. The authentic price of any car is how many man-hours of labor at the average wage did it take to buy the car. (Some economists would argue the number of ounces of gold at market prices it would take to buy the car.) But you have to admit that modern cars are a whole lot more sophisticated in 1974 than in 1947!
1973 Pinto Runabout with upgraded 2.0 liter & 4 speed, and factory sunroof. My first car, now restored, and better than it was when it rolled off the assembly line!

Offline dga57

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2020, 01:30:31 AM »
But you have to admit that modern cars are a whole lot more sophisticated in 1974 than in 1947!
No argument with that!  That increased sophistication came with a high price tag and it is even truer when comparing to cars of today.  In today's economy however, only those of us who actually have firsthand knowledge find any credibility at all in the idea of a brand new car selling for $900 or even $2900. 

Dwayne :)
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Offline 65ShelbyClone

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2020, 11:34:38 AM »
Economy cars were in high demand, so it's not surprising to see the price tag start at full retail and go up from there. Same thing happened 10-12 years ago; suddenly Excursions and Hummers were worth less than Civics and Corollas. What's more eyebrow-raising is to see that the Pinto's base price went up by 50% in just four years.

I just have to point out that 6.75 Traction-Lok option though. And what's with the $30 charge for tires? Were those an "upgrade" or not included with a car at the base price?  ???
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Offline Wittsend

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2020, 11:55:52 AM »
It mentions the "steel belted ply radial tires" and "styled steel wheel" in the upper section that seems associated with that specific  model (Sports Accent Group). The $30 for the tires are for the more sportier BR-70-13" tires that are also associated with the $53 alloy wheels.

So, were those upgrade wheels/tires on the car at the factory (and seemingly charged twice) or were there upgrade tires/wheels price discounted for the value of the base price wheels tires???

Offline dga57

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2020, 04:53:48 PM »
65ShelbyClone is 100% correct about the way car prices trend.  The purchase of my new Pinto came right on the heels of the biggest fuel crisis since WWII - you could only purchase gasoline on even/odd dates, based on your license plate number.  My girlfriend's family owned the local Sunoco station and made it possible for me to circumvent that by filling after dark when the station was actually closed.  I digress however.  What I wanted to say was that Pintos had very little markup so dealers generally held out for full MSRP and even added on extra charge things like undercoating and dealer prep to strengthen their profit.  I receive a discount on mine for one reason and one reason only: my dad had been dealing with that particular little rural Ford-Mercury dealership for about twenty years, and generally bought a new car every couple of years and a new truck about every 3 - 4.  Those are the customers dealers will bend over backward to keep happy!  At the time I ordered my Pinto, he was about a year into a 1973 LTD Brougham and also had a 1971 4x4 pickup which he was about due to replace.  This dealership was so small that it was operated by the dealer himself, one secretary, and one salesman... all the other employees were mechanics, etc.  Dad always dealt directly with the owner and that discount was given to me to keep that good vibe going.  So, it cost me $2900. I kept it two years and in 1976 traded it on a used 1973 Lincoln Continental Town Car that was priced at a ridiculously low $3600.  I received $2600 for it, meaning I hopped from one end of the Ford lineup to the other for a measly $1000 difference.  Granted, I backed up a year model-wise... but still!  I was a very low mileage driver (the Pinto had about 17,000 miles on it after two years) and gas was still relatively cheap (fifty to sixty cents per gallon) so I got along fine with the Lincoln ownership experience despite its 460 CID V-8.  I was eighteen at that time and by the time I turned 21 I had figured out a way to buy a brand new Lincoln - a white and wedgewood blue Mark V.  I developed a love for the big comfortable Lincolns and now own my seventeenth one, a 2017 Continental Reserve.  Dreams of my pretty little orange Pinto Runabout plagued me for years however, to the point that I began a search for one in 2006, and finally hit paydirt about four years ago.  Bought a couple of other Pintos along the way while I was searching, but an orange '74 Runabout was my ultimate goal.  I would have never found one without this site and the friends I've made here... it's been invaluable to me.

Dwayne :)
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Offline Henrius

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2020, 01:18:01 PM »
Great story, Dwayne! From the bottom of the Ford line to the top you went, and so quickly! You must not have had penny-pinching college years like so many of us.


We all yearn for that first car, just like trout yearn to return to their spawning ground. I am so glad I never sold my first Pinto!
1973 Pinto Runabout with upgraded 2.0 liter & 4 speed, and factory sunroof. My first car, now restored, and better than it was when it rolled off the assembly line!

Offline dga57

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2020, 05:23:01 PM »
Great story, Dwayne! From the bottom of the Ford line to the top you went, and so quickly! You must not have had penny-pinching college years like so many of us.


We all yearn for that first car, just like trout yearn to return to their spawning ground. I am so glad I never sold my first Pinto!

Just like the Pinto to Lincoln thing, my career track is an interesting story as well.  Veterinary science interested me and, to that end, I took an after-school job with a local veterinarian while still in high school.  I'm glad that I did for two reasons: I discovered that I really didn't care all that much for the field, and it led me to Dr. William A. Shinpock who became my mentor, my friend, and my business partner.  The practice of veterinary medicine was not quite the money-maker in the early 1970's that it is today and he had an entrepreneuria l spirit which led him to develop other businesses to boost his income.  He owned an automatic car wash, a small chain of gasoline stations, a salvage company, and an auction house, among other pursuits.  For whatever reason, we really hit it off well.  He offered to put me through college and veterinary school but, when I came to the realization that I really didn't want that for my lifelong profession, he offered me an interest in his business holdings.  My responsibility in all that was to oversee the individual managers he had running the various businesses.  It wasn't long before I detected rampant embezzlement throughout the organization due, in part, to his focus on the animal hospital and his resulting inattention to the businesses.  As long as he was shown a profit, he was satisfied that he was doing well.  All the managers were terminated but not prosecuted.  He made no attempt to recover his losses or to destroy anyone's life, but they were all informed why they were being let go and shown the proof we had to use against them if they tried to fight that move.  Together he and I interviewed and hired all new managers and, while business remained about the same, his personal profits more than doubled.  This was all BEFORE I even graduated from high school!  Then, during my first year of college I noticed a problem with the gas station chain's profits declining while our actual sales volumes were going up.  Same old problem involving one of the managers.  Fortunately, this time the damage was limited to only one location.  School was out for the summer so I took over the reins of that station myself while continuing to oversee the management of all the other enterprises.  As autumn approached, I chose to take a skip year from school and give the Shinpock businesses my undivided attention.  Long story short, I never returned to college and my reward was total ownership of the gas stations and a 25% interest in the rest of his business holdings.  I ultimately got out of the gas stations altogether and sought a regular job in order to add some sanity to my life, but to some degree Bill and I remained financially linked in various ventures until he died about fifteen years ago.  I never went back to college, and I would never advocate that for anyone, but my association with Bill has allowed me to achieve more financial independence than most college graduates I know.  I sold cars for awhile before finding my niche in the industrial side of hospital work and I still love it to this day, after working at it for 40 years.  I feel that I am contributing something worthwhile, the advancements in technology make it ever new and challenging, and I have absolutely no plans to retire anytime soon.  That started out in 1980 as a low paying job but I was able to ride it out because of my other sources of income.  Today, the position I hold would require an engineering degree for a new hire.  So... I've been very fortunate in life.  I basically tell you this to simply affirm that I didn't have the penny-pinching college years that so many experienced.  Any regrets?  Sometimes.  A diploma hanging on the wall would look great but there's also a sense of satisfaction that I got here by a totally unique route and against a lot of odds.     

Dwayne :)
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Offline Henrius

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2020, 08:36:10 PM »
That is an inspiring story, Dwayne, and I admire you for your success.


On the other hand, I was the guy that got a doctorate and has slugged it out in private practice for over 30 years- making only a comfortable upper middle class income. I wish I possessed your prowess. A manager embezzled from me for 5 years and nearly ran the practice into the ground.


People like you amaze me- not so much book learning as I have, but a lot of street smarts so you could make a good living. No amount of book learning will make up for a lack of street smarts. No college will ever teach you which potential employees will be good ones, which customers will stiff you, and which patients are drug addicts.


The thing you have to be grateful for, though, was your senior partner was an honorable man who did not flip-flam you out of your share of the business. Minority shareholders can be easy victims.
1973 Pinto Runabout with upgraded 2.0 liter & 4 speed, and factory sunroof. My first car, now restored, and better than it was when it rolled off the assembly line!

Offline dga57

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #15 on: July 31, 2020, 01:00:24 AM »
Thank you.

I generally do not divulge my lack of formal education to anyone who doesn't have a need to know or who doesn't specifically question me about it, but I chose to here because you hit the nail on the head with your comment about the finances of the average college student.  I didn't do it to brag - however, I am proud of the way my life has turned out.  I have a comfortable lifestyle, a great family, and my friends are mostly educators, engineers, and medical professionals.  I decided to share in order to pay homage to Bill Shinpock for seeing my potential and making me believe that sometimes "the road less traveled does", as the poem says, "make all the difference."  Looking back on it all, I do not believe there would have been any financial reward to becoming a DVM, even with the offer of a free education, and I don't believe it would have afforded me the time and flexibility to follow my own interests as I have over the years.  I have an occupation I love, I've moonlighted as a semi-professional musician for 36 years, I'm a published author, and I am a moderator/administrator on this site (all things I love doing).  I am forever indebted to and grateful for Bill's friendship and guidance.  Everyone should be so lucky to find a mentor who truly believes in them!  True success is doing what you love and loving what you do.

Dwayne :)   
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Offline 65ShelbyClone

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2020, 09:04:15 PM »
I'm glad you shared that because I found it inspirational as well. I'm formally educated and a fancy degree certainly doesn't guarantee nor define one's "success."

True success is doing what you love and loving what you do.

Full stop. Go to print.
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Offline Wittsend

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2020, 12:27:32 PM »
Maybe we need to change the title of this thread? It is interesting how each of our paths weave through life. Either for inspiration or the contemplation I offer my experience but to the young person reading know that each life is different. And in stating such it is likely not wise to model anyone's life but rather glean what you can from each onto yourself.


I grew up what I call "Suburban Poor." My first ten years in New Jersey we were a blended family with 8 kids in a one bathroom, one car household. I can remember my parents scraping up $5, the required minimum for the oil truck to come and deliver fuel for heat. When I was 10 my parents separated and my mother abruptly moved her kids to California. Three years later she remarried.  We lived in middle class neighborhoods but that was about it. A roof over our head, clothes on our backs and food on the table. The extras in life that I saw other kids have (ski trips, Catalina trips, Disneyland trips, Schwinn Stringray bikes, etc., etc.) were not ours to be had. I had gotten into slot cars but money was always tight. My parents gave no allowance (though I had more household chores than any of my friends). We were not allowed to get regular jobs (like a box boy) because we were told that it would 'ruin our school work.'  I remember my first slot race I had taken an old orange juice can and over months eventually filled it with 100 pennies for my $1 race entrance fee. Racing slot cars was one of my greatest joys in life. I was a 13 year old kid who though winning few races often got 2nd or 3rd place over grown adults. And I did it with cars I build mostly from their old scrapes. My entrance fee eventually came from not eating lunch at school and using the lunch money to race.


I never intend to be college bound. My parents never encouraged it saying college was for 'Doctors and Lawyers.' My main high school focus was shop classes. My goal was to work somewhere I could build race engines/cars. Unfortunately as a sprinter in high school I had torn a hamstring that needed surgery and there was a six month delay in entering the work force. Eventually I got a job in an auto parts store. Six months of dealing with disgruntled customers (who is happy when their car breaks) I thought college might not be a bad idea.


I spent a year at Los Angeles Trade Tech college. Knowing that engines need to be built within a thousands of an inch and finding that difficult, if not impossible I became discouraged. My parents were moving and I had the option of going with them or getting a job and staying where I was. I opted to go. One of my high school requirements was to take a class in theater, speech or TV Production.  Shy as I was then TV Production seemed the best choice and I did well in the class. At our new location there were TV Production classes offered at the local college. After my second year I was hanging out in the studio and the Tech muttered that everyone he had lined up for an assistant position was flaking on him. He said I was always there and if I wanted the job it was mine. I jumped at it. My life became one of a community college "Lifer" as I was there for four years - and still far short of graduating.


I was then 24, had lost my long time girlfriend, was living 100 feet from the freeway in a converted garage and surviving on $350 a month. My life was going NOWHERE! I told the tech I needed to get a life and wouldn't be back in the Fall. I worked for a production company soldering circuits for these guys who spent the whole day screaming at each other. I quit. I worked for a cable company as an installer in the hopes that when they opened their studio I would have a foot in the door to work there. Day three the installers were expected to be bill collectors. I quit. An acquaintance got me a real film job and in one week I made my normal months income. Nice but there was nothing afterwards. Then I got a call from the college Tech. He was going out on a medical leave and had a list of things that needed to be accomplished as a temporary hire. I told him I'd come back but at the first notion of outside work I'd be gone.


What was suppose to be a few weeks work ran into the semester starting and the Tech still not back. The money wasn't great but it was money. The Dean came to me and (as if I were still the official assistant - I wasn't) and told me to keep coming in full time. I told him my agreement that I might be gone at any moment. A month went by and I got called in. I figured it was a 'thank you for your work..., but the Tech is coming back.' Instead I was told he would be out indefinitely and they were offering me real money as his fill in. In the end the Tech never came back, I eventually applied for the position permanently and got it.


Within two years of that time I had a good paying job, got married and bought a house. It was quite a change from the 24 year old who was going nowhere. You would think all would be well, but it wasn't. The house had a severely damaged foundation and I worked myself to the bone in an attempt to remedy the problem. The job was very stressful. I knew that going in but who would turn down the highest paying classified job in the district. The stress just got to me and I developed a heart arrhythmia. It only added to the stress. Being 27 years old and feeling your heart skip a beat every 6 beats can really slam the brakes on your life. I struggled through that another 6 years.


In 1990 a number of things coincided. My father in law had been involved in a lawsuit. He won the initial judgement but the case went all the way to the US Supreme Court. He had passed away in the process. The court ruled in his favor. My wife (his heir) received the settlement. It didn't make us rich but it allowed me to shift to part time work and her to stop working so we could raise a family. This also coincided with me having the minimum work experience to apply for a part time teaching position. And, this coincided with one of the few times instructors in our department were taking back to back sabbaticals.


My credential was only good for two years, however I was told (three times I checked) that I would be "grandfathered" in to new stipulations. In the end I wasn't. I was given one semester leave of absence (plus the summer session) to take all the needed classes to graduate and retain my position. It was an odd feeling to become a student at the same school you teach at. It is a long story as to how that almost didn't happen but suffice it to say I met the requirements and for 23 years taught TV Production part time. I nearly lost my position 10 years in when they hired another full time instructor. In this case another long time part timer passed away and I got his classes. Eventually in 2014 they were again looking to hire another full time instructor. There was no safety net this time. At 56 I opted to leave a year early than I needed to. I have never lost a job and I was ready to go anyway. Teaching can be rewarding but frankly it required a lot of "management" on my part for students who were there just killing time. Administration was little help most of them only looking to "appear" productive for advancement. I live a VERY frugal life but I am content. If "Tinkering" were a profession it would be my first choice. What I don't earn in income I compensate by doing for myself.  It suits me well.


As I look back I am grateful that, by the grace of God, my life though full of struggles, never faltered to destitution. I'm also grateful to Jon Kavesh who offered me the assistant job he intend for others. It was the genesis of my career. And lastly to Dr. Sidney Adler who twice gave me the chance of a lifetime to be the permanent Tech and eventually an Instructor. Few people saw me as other than a young, shy person and didn't know the passion and fire I had simmering inside. If you are a young person reading this have a plan but be flexible. You do not know what twist and turns lay ahead in life. But be wise. Know when to go in another direction.

Offline dga57

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2020, 02:19:04 PM »
If you are a young person reading this have a plan but be flexible. You do not know what twist and turns lay ahead in life. But be wise. Know when to go in another direction.

Inspirational words of wisdom for sure!  I think individualism is key.  There's nothing wrong with becoming a doctor or lawyer because your dad was one, or a nurse or teacher because that was your mom's choice, but I think the concept of daring to think outside the box, making a plan or having a dream, and then going for it, will ultimately bring you more satisfaction in life.  I have a friend whose family pushed him to study medicine because his father, and his father's father, were physicians.  His heart wasn't in it but, good son that he was, he gave it his all.  When he made it, he took over his dad's private practice and after about ten years was so disillusioned and unhappy that he walked away from medicine altogether.  He then decided to pursue what he had secretly wanted to do all along: he became a high school science teacher!  Far less income, but happiness isn't measured in dollars.  Thanks for sharing!

Dwayne :)   
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Offline Reeves1

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2020, 05:42:43 AM »



 ;D

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2020, 06:11:19 AM »
That's the way my projects usually go too!!! ;D
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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2020, 03:28:42 PM »
Based on experience...




"Time" can also be interchanged with "cost."
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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2020, 03:34:08 PM »
"Time" can also be interchanged with "cost."
I like the efficiency of a dual purpose graph.  ;D

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #23 on: August 09, 2020, 05:32:47 PM »
Thank you.

I generally do not divulge my lack of formal education to anyone who doesn't have a need to know or who doesn't specifically question me about it, but I chose to here because you hit the nail on the head with your comment about the finances of the average college student.  I didn't do it to brag - however, I am proud of the way my life has turned out.  I have a comfortable lifestyle, a great family, and my friends are mostly educators, engineers, and medical professionals.  I decided to share in order to pay homage to Bill Shinpock for seeing my potential and making me believe that sometimes "the road less traveled does", as the poem says, "make all the difference."  Looking back on it all, I do not believe there would have been any financial reward to becoming a DVM, even with the offer of a free education, and I don't believe it would have afforded me the time and flexibility to follow my own interests as I have over the years.  I have an occupation I love, I've moonlighted as a semi-professional musician for 36 years, I'm a published author, and I am a moderator/administrator on this site (all things I love doing).  I am forever indebted to and grateful for Bill's friendship and guidance.  Everyone should be so lucky to find a mentor who truly believes in them!  True success is doing what you love and loving what you do.

Dwayne :)   

FYI, the average income of a DVM is only $70,000 a year! The only rich professionals I meet happened to be very good managers and would have made it in other fields as well. The healing professions often are a mediocre income when debt repayment is considered.

Luck may play a part in success. You were lucky in meeting Mr. Shinpock, but successful because your were street smart, honest, and a hard worker. He was willing to take a chance on you because those qualities were obvious to him. Success comes to those who are prepared.

That is why I don't buy any of this nonsense lately that groups "have no chance in America"  and "privilege prevents them from succeeding here." I have patients of every race, creed, color and national origin. The successful ones have the same things in common: self discipline with money, good values, a work ethic, and the ability to pick themselves up and try again when things do not go right.
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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2020, 12:48:08 PM »
... I have patients of every race, creed, color and national origin. The successful ones have the same things in common: self discipline with money, good values, a work ethic, and the ability to pick themselves up and try again when things do not go right.

Likewise as a college instructor I have seen similar. Life is what you MAKE it, not what you expect of it. BTW, nicely stated without being political.

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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2020, 01:32:28 PM »
Inspirational words of wisdom for sure!  I think individualism is key.  There's nothing wrong with becoming a doctor or lawyer because your dad was one, or a nurse or teacher because that was your mom's choice, but I think the concept of daring to think outside the box, making a plan or having a dream, and then going for it, will ultimately bring you more satisfaction in life.  I have a friend whose family pushed him to study medicine because his father, and his father's father, were physicians.  His heart wasn't in it but, good son that he was, he gave it his all.  When he made it, he took over his dad's private practice and after about ten years was so disillusioned and unhappy that he walked away from medicine altogether.  He then decided to pursue what he had secretly wanted to do all along: he became a high school science teacher!  Far less income, but happiness isn't measured in dollars.  Thanks for sharing!

Dwayne :)   

The name might not be familiar, but Georg Phillip Telemann was the most successful of all Baroque music composers. Then as now, being a musician was not the most lucrative nor prestigious of occupations. Georg's parents did not rest until he got into a university law degree program. Through college he kept the music up. He never practiced law, but he took the musical world by storm. One might suppress a passion, but one can never kill it.
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Re: 1975 Pinto Window Sticker
« Reply #26 on: August 10, 2020, 06:29:24 PM »
One might suppress a passion, but one can never kill it.

Absolute truth!!!
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