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Offline popbumper

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Windshield installation
« on: September 02, 2014, 08:07:47 PM »
Hi all:
 
  Has anyone here done their OWN windshield installation? I have a NOS windshield and will be getting a new gasket, my new headliner is in, and I'm ready to go.  IF you have PLEASE share your techniques, problems, materials. I am aware and have used the ROPE method on my previous 1957 Chevy, I'm more concerned with the factory using that "polystyrene tape" which is no longer available, and how to overcome that particular hurdle.
 
Anyone - please. THANK YOU!
 
Chris
Restoring a 1976 MPG wagon - purchased 6/08

Offline oldkayaker

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Re: Windshield installation
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2014, 07:15:05 AM »
I have done it a couple of times but do not know the professional tricks.  I used the cord method too.  I was not aware of the window frame foam/PVC tape until your post and looked it up in the Ford manual.  I did not use the tape and did not have any sealing problems (ignorance was bliss).

The thing that really helped me was using Armorall on the gasket and windshield frame.  It seems to make the rubber more flexible and allows things to slide/slip around more.  It does make a mess though.

If you need to pry on the rubber lip, use a piece of wood (i.e. half a clothes pin, popsicle stick, etc.) instead of a screw driver.  The glass is not forgiving.
Jerry J - Jupiter, Florida

Offline Wittsend

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Re: Windshield installation
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2014, 03:27:59 PM »
You did not state the year of your Pinto. Some windshields are gasketed, and others glue in. 3-M Bed & Glazing Compound TRM-8509  is what I used to recently seat a gasketed windshield.  It was about $12 for a standard size caulk tube at Summit.  My installation was a '64 Studebaker Daytona and I basically used the whole tube. I used the string method. It was string of the thickness of window blind cord.

As Jerry stated use wood, not steel to manipulate the rubber and be wise and prudent when you do. Windshield installation is no fun. In the case of my Studebaker the windshields are almost impossible to find.  2-1/2 years of searching got me a rather scratched, bull'seye-ed windshield. My son had to transport it 400 miles without breaking it. Then we has to install it without breaking it.  And, every time I walk by that car I stare at a minute crack at the bull'seye and wonder if it is getting larger - or not.  At least with Pinto's the glass is easier to come by.  That said, a few trips to Pick Your Part ago I picked one up for the Pinto for safe keeping.  $22 out the door on 50% off day.

Offline Yelby

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Re: Windshield installation
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2014, 09:37:05 AM »
I just finished installing my 76 wagon windshield for the 2nd time in 2 months.
 
First time I used the rope method.  I did not use the foam tape at the bottom of the windshield gasket.  I did not put sealant in the gasket groove that goes over the pinch weld because I didn't want to drag it into the the car with the rope.  I did apply the sealant all around the outside of the gasket and between the glass and gasket.  Because the pinch weld along the base of the windshield is so uneven, the water was able to find its way up and over the pinch weld.
 
The second installation, I placed the gasket on the pinch weld.  Taped the gasket to hold it up along the top.  Pulled the gasket off of the pinch weld a little bit at a time, applying CRL 7711(cartridge) into the gasket groove and placing it back over the pinch weld.  I made sure plenty was installed along the bottom and the two lower 90 degree corners.  I then continued up along both sides and across the top, a little bit at a time.  Using masking tape along the top really helps keep the gasket up once the sealant is applied.
 
Set the glass down into the gasket starting with one corner.  Pull up the outer lip of the gasket using a flat plastic tool.  Pull the tool across to the opposite corner, seating the glass as you go.  Be gentle and patient as you pull the lip up and around the other bottom corner.  Now the glass will lay there.  Start up one side, pulling up the lip as you go.  My helper used another plastic tool (from the inside)to gently push the outer lip out towards me so I could hook it and keep sliding my tool up as we went.   Go to the opposite side of the car and do the same thing.  Finally, work your way across the top.  Remember to pull out the masking tape as you go.
 
I used a brand new gasket from Steele Rubber.  I did the installation out in the sun.  The heat seemed to make the gasket more pliable. 
 
Next I used CRL 1716 sealant.  It comes in a can and is flowable.  I purchased the suggested trigger pump that screws onto the can.  Start at the center top of the glass and pull back the gasket lip and insert the metal tip of the pump.  Apply sealant at the back edge of the glass and enough extra so that it oozes out as you let the lip back down and pull the tip along.  Avoid nicking the edge of the glass with the pump tip.  Apply sealant along the top.  Next start at the center of the base of the windshield and pull out to each side.  Finally, apply sealant to both sides.   Apply tape on the body at each nail head, screw hole and drain hole and mark with a pen.  Install your trim clips on the nail heads and apply the 7711 (cartridge) sealant around the entire outside of gasket, make sure you get it in and around the clips.  Clean out sealant from the six drain holes along the base of the windshield.  These holes drain into the area under the cowl vent.  Screw in the six metal plates that hold the gasket down tight against the base of the windshield and keep the glass from shifting down.  Install trim at base of windshield, remember the screw in each corner.  Install remaining trim.  Scrape off the majority of the sealant that has oozed out onto the glass.  I used mineral spirits for clean up.
 
I read somewhere that spraying foaming window cleaner on the glass helps with the scraping.  I did not try that though.
 
The plastic trim tools were purchased at Harbor Freight.  The sealant and trigger pump were purchased from a C.R. Laurence distributor.
 
Sorry this was so long.

Offline popbumper

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Re: Windshield installation
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2014, 05:59:03 PM »
Sadly last weekend's events turned disastrous as my perfectly new and never used (not to mention impossible to find anywhere) replacement PPG windshield neatly cracked in half as we were finishing the install. Boy was I pissed - and still am.......
Restoring a 1976 MPG wagon - purchased 6/08

Online dga57

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Re: Windshield installation
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2014, 11:46:37 PM »
Gee, Chris, I wish I could think of something magic to say that would make you feel better - but I can't, so I'll just say how sorry I am to hear about that.  What a bummer!

Dwayne
Pinto Car Club of America - Serving the Ford Pinto enthusiast since 1999.

Offline dick1172762

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Re: Windshield installation
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2014, 09:16:33 AM »
What I've done in the past is locating an installer as I drive around the city and talk him in to working in his off hour's. Doesn't need to be the next day as I just get their phone #. Never been turned down as all were just looking for a few extra bucks.
Its better to be a has-been, than a never was.

Offline 74 PintoWagon

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Re: Windshield installation
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2014, 10:27:59 AM »
Man that sucks, so sorry to hear that.
Art
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Offline amc49

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Re: Windshield installation
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2014, 08:24:25 AM »
In my view using the rubber gasket seems better but far more potential stress on the glass getting it in. I installed a previously gasketed glass with no gasket and old school tar rope and easier, that was 20 years ago and still no leaks. When glass done I filled in the side gaps at shield edges with Home Depot roofing repair brushable tar before the trim went on.