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Offline Destroyasaur

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Suspension Overhaul
« on: August 30, 2019, 12:52:12 AM »
Hey Folks,

So, I just got a 71 Rundabout and it has some serious bounce and body roll. If I stand next to the car and shake it with one hand it rocks very easily, not to mention it keeps rocking after I let go. I'm reasonably certain that its the original suspension from 71.

So, being new to Pintos, and leaf spring cars in general, I need a little advice.

For the rear:
1: Can I just buy new leaf springs and bushings, and then reuse my old shackles and and bolts, or is that a bad Idea?
2: When doing the rear suspension, what all do I need? In terms of parts.
3: The only rear leaf springs that fits a 71 that I've found so far are the Landrum units. Are they any good? any other suggestions? I'm looking for stock or maybe a little over stock stiffness. Though I'd like to keep stock height. I live in Oakland and there's a damn lot of potholes (ill post a link to the Landrums for reference at the bottom of the bottom of this post)
4: Any rear shock suggestions?
5: Do I need new perches for the shocks? Or is the schock switch as easy as just switching out the units?

For the front:
1: Suggestions on springs and front shocks?
2: Do i need anything besides just the new units

I know a lot of the questions will be answered by the Chiltons manual, but its not coming in the mail for another few days. Thanks in advance folks! I'm looking forward to getting involved in the community! Ill post some pictures of my car once I can get it out of the garage during daylight hours.

W

Link to the Landrum leaf spring i referenced:      https://www.carid.com/landrum-performance-spring/mini-stock-multi-leaff-spring-mpn-42-454sp.html?singleid=207837583&url=17002730

Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2019, 02:11:36 AM »
On cars from 71-73 the suspension was unique to those years and brake and suspension parts are often difficult to find.

74-80 cars share a lot of suspension parts with mustang ii and other ford products.

Body roll is usually caused by worn front shocks or worn sway bar bushings or mounts

Unless the rear sits really low compared to the front your rear springs are probably ok.

 Front shocks are the least expensive and easiest place to start.

Start with new front shocks since these tend to be the most important and if your rear ones are really bad do those as well.

An old sports car rally rule to optomize handling is to keep the front suspension stiff and the rear suspension soft to improve oversteer.

Pintos are pretty light so unless you want to make the car into a race car you dont need expensive shocks, just get some basic inexpensive stock ones from autozone.

Also do check the front sway bar bushings and mounts.

The bushings are pretty cheep and easy to replace.

If the rear "BOUNCES"  alot you might look at replacing the rear shocks as well

IF yor rear springs are SAGGING, consider some shocks with adjustable helper springs, a lot easier to find and install than nerw rear leaf springs.

Another option is to just add another leaf to the stock springs.

ALSO if you decide to replace the front brake pads.. go with the softest ORGANIC pads you can find rather than the semi metallic ones to avoid wear on your rotors.

Front brake rotors for 71-73 cars are extremely difficult to find and very expensive so try to preserve them.

Let us know how this works for you.
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline 65ShelbyClone

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2019, 08:09:53 PM »
IMO, Gas-A-Justs play nicer with stiffer springs. They can be on the harsh side with softer ones.

An old sports car rally rule to optomize handling is to keep the front suspension stiff and the rear suspension soft to improve oversteer.
I always thought that would increase understeer because the soft rear will stick better. Like the opposite of adding a rear sway bar to make the back end slide better.
Being a '71, it's possible that there is no front swaybar at all. My '72 didn't have one stock.
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Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2019, 08:32:02 PM »
My 73 wagon has a front sway bar..

I replaced my front shocks with the cheepo autozone $20 4 years ago and they work fine.

As far as the stiff front and soft rear, its a common practice among the MGB racer community, I assumed it was to avoid understeer.

It probably has something to do with the solid rear axle vs independent rear suspension..

Anyway i put soft shocks on all 4 corners and it provides nice ride and my wagon seems to handle pretty well.

I also put in new tie rod ends and tightened the tie rod to steering rack nuts to eliminate play there.

Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline 65ShelbyClone

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2019, 11:50:09 PM »
The wagons did come with front swaybars, but early hatches did not. Early swaybar mounts were also quite different than '74-80. I'm pretty sure I looked at your wagon when the previous owner had it.

My comment about understeer came from an early Mustang background. A thick front swaybar will flatten their cornering and increase understeer while adding a rear swaybar will make the back end easier to swing out.
'72 Runabout - 2.3T, T5, MegaSquirt-II, 8", 5-lugs, big brakes.
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Offline Destroyasaur

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2019, 01:22:29 AM »
Well, I'm glad to hear that my leaf springs are probably okay! And good info on those brake rotors. Sometime this week when I have time I plan on getting under there and having a look at the pads, rotors, and the suspension bushings, mounts, and the steering components. Ill report back on what I find. You guys like rock auto for pinto parts? Do they usually have a pretty good stock of bushings, mounts, and so forth for pintos?

I do usually like a somewhat firmer than stock suspension so I think I'll most likely have a closer look at the those Gas-adjust KYBs. Seems like they aren't took expensive over all.

I do have to apologize that I don't have any pictures yet, I meant to get a few today but got stuck at work until after it was dark. But here's a picture from the craigslist add I got the car from. Hard to tell in the picture, but I haven't noticed the rear end sagging at all.

One thing that's not suspension related that I noticed today, on start up the engine doesn't build oil pressure for a solid 6-10 seconds. Is that normal for the 2ltr engines? Seems like an awfully long time. That being said, after those 10 seconds oil pressure responds to engine speed as you would expect, with about 13 pounds at idle once warmed up. Although, I think I have a bad thermostat because it takes an age to get up to 180, and doesn't really rise above that.

Thanks again folks! I cant wait to get under this car! Just have to be patient and get passed the next few crazy weeks of work before i can really get into it.


Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2019, 07:25:53 PM »
As far as rock auto..

Every 5ime i ch3cked their prices they were a lot cheeper than other places

BUT they make it up and more on shipping..

A part that Autozone charges  $12 for they sell for $9 but charge $6 for shipping..

Sounds like you might need a new oil filter and thicker oil.

Or your main bearings are worn.

My engine holds 40 psi at idle cold and 35 hot and comes up in about 1 second.

At 3000 rpm it goes to 60 psi hot or cold

I use an Autolite FL1 filter and 20/50 valvoline VR1 racing oil, its the only current motor oil that has enough zinc to prov8de proper lubrication for older wngines.

As far as suspension, as I mentioned, the stiff front and soft rear c9mes from the MGB rac8ng guys, not sure why but its how i always set up my mgbs.
 
Anyway, sounds like the poster just needs new shocks and a good oil change.
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2019, 07:30:36 PM »
Where are yiu located 65 Shelby?

I got my wagon from a fellow in Bakersfield, CA in November, 2015

He said he found it in a garage in the mountains above Victorville.

He mentioned that he had someone else looking at it when I got it.
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline 65ShelbyClone

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2019, 09:14:03 PM »
One thing that's not suspension related that I noticed today, on start up the engine doesn't build oil pressure for a solid 6-10 seconds. Is that normal for the 2ltr engines?
I would say no. What oil filter is on it? Sounds like the anti-drainback valve could be faulty.

Where are yiu located 65 Shelby?

I got my wagon from a fellow in Bakersfield, CA in November, 2015

He said he found it in a garage in the mountains above Victorville.

He mentioned that he had someone else looking at it when I got it.
I'm about an hour south of Bakersfield and the time frame is right. I wasn't looking to buy the car, but bought some parts from him. I was looking for a front sway bar and that's when I found out how different the early and late ones are. He had an early wagon parts car and the front sway bar and mounts wouldn't clear my huge oil pan.  :P
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Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2019, 09:22:24 PM »
Im in texas now but i lived in north hollywood northwest of bur ank airport from 1990 till i move to rexas in 2013

I saw the car advertised on craigslist, and one of my clients needed computer work in northridge so they paid for a plane ticket for me to fly to north hollywood.

I sent the guy a deposit and when i got to north hollywood had a friend drive me to bakersfield to pick up the wagon.

I got some spare parts, mostly some rear glass but not a lot more..
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline Destroyasaur

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2019, 01:21:55 AM »
Good to know about rock auto. There’s an oreily down the street that I usually do most of my non internet shopping at. But they definitely don’t have a good stock in house for pinto parts I’m noticing.

As for the stiffer front, softer rear. You’re not just talking about spring rates right? You’re saying get stock performance shocks for the rear and stiffer ones for the front? Or are you saying I should get the gas adjust shocks all around and maybe some slightly stiffer coils for The front if I feel like I want to get my handeling turned up a bit?

I just changed my oil tonight to castrol 20/50 and put in a new wix oil filter. I guess we will see when I start the car up tomorrow evening if that solved my oil problem. Sure hope it’s not the main berrings...the engine allegedly had a rebuild 12k ago, but that was also back in the year 2000. I sort of was hoping to drive it a bit more before having to do a rebuild.

Other fun issues that cropped up as I was working on it this evenin: the front breaks won’t bleed. The bleeder nipples were very stuck and took a good amount of penetrating oil and persuasion to get loose, and then nothing came out when I tried to bleed them. When I get the chance I’ll pull the calipers and clean them out but I’m a bit worried they’re toast. Oreiley aperently has remanufactured one for about $40 a pop, but I’d rather save the money. Any ideas?

The other  new thing I found after changing the oil is now after I shut off the engine I hear a gurgeling noise for about 6 or 7 seconds. Sounds like it’s coming from under the valve cover. But I haven’t had the chance to investigate under there yet. Although it’s due a valve adjustment probably anyway, so it won’t be long before I get to that.

Looks like pretty much all the rubber bushings under the car are pretty old and cracked, certainly all the ones in the leaf springs anyway. And one of the steering boots is cracked open and looks totally dry inside. Seems like my super clean, and well running purchase may need a bit more love than I anticipated. Good thing I love my garage

Just for context, the car has was sitting for a pretty good chuck of time before I got it. That being said, it had aviation fuel in it so there’s no signs of a dirty carb and most of the time it starts on the first crank like a champ.

Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2019, 10:14:23 AM »
The things you describe are just the typical things you encounter with older cars since stuff does wear out and are usually pretty simple to fix.

What part of the country are you located in?

Is your car a 4 speed or automatic?

You might check at autozone for parts and make friends with the counter people as well they seem to have access to parts and are pretty helpful about helping order stuff not on rhe shelf.

Also if your car still has a breaker point ignition, do consider converting to a Pertronics electr9nic module and coil that will make a considerable difference in reliability.

I did some posts here about how to wire up the Pertronics to use the high performance coil.

Also changing your factory cam pully to a STEEL not alloy adjustable cam pulley and advancing the cam timing will make an improvement in performance.

As far as the bushings for the front suspension its pretty normal for them to wear, if you replace them consider the urethane replacements.

Autozone has boots for the front rack, tbey are not oem but universal replaceme ts and work ok.

The rack was designed to be filled with oil for lubrication but as soon as the boots leak the oil leaks out. I usually just lube the rack and joints where the tie rods attach to the rack with grease and replace the boots every few years.

Autozone also sells front calipers.

As far as oil, a lot of folks like Valvoline 20 50 VR1 racing oil because it still  ontains zinc which is necessary for older engines.

The gurgling is probably just oil draining back down into the crankcase from the cam cover. Or water in the cooling system.

Also the big motorcraft FL1 filters flow.oil better and will provide better oil pressure.
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline Destroyasaur

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2019, 11:47:37 PM »
Well the answer is in. When I started the car for the first time in about 24 hours it took a solid 13 seconds to register oil pressure. And that's after I put the 20w50 in and a new wix on and warmed it up last night. So I'm guessing I probably have worn main bearings. Think i should worry about the lack of oil pressure on a fresh start up? Or is it not too bad as long as I don't rev it up? It only takes that long to build pressure after not starting it for a while. Otherwise It only takes a second or two.

Furthermore, I took your advice FordMan, and i got the vr1 racing oil and the big fl1 filter. I figure I'll run the castrol oil for a week to get all the grime mixed into it and then do another oil change, and switch to the better oil and higher flowing filter/

Quote
The things you describe are just the typical things you encounter with older cars since stuff does wear out and are usually pretty simple to fix.

Yeah, I don't doubt that. Just keep finding the little things. Ill get to them all with time.

Quote
What part of the country are you located in?

I'm located in Oakland California so I've got about 4 Auto zones within 2 miles of me  ;D Know any other pinto guys in the area?

Quote
Is your car a 4 speed or automatic?

Its a 4 speed. I generally avoid automatics, i don't find them nearly as fun to drive

Quote
Also if your car still has a breaker point ignition, do consider converting to a Pertronics electr9nic module and coil that will make a considerable difference in reliability.

I did some posts here about how to wire up the Pertronics to use the high performance coil.

Also changing your factory cam pully to a STEEL not alloy adjustable cam pulley and advancing the cam timing will make an improvement in performance.

At the moment I'm still running points, but an electronic module is definitely in my future.

Yeah I've been looking into those cam pulleys. They really do make that big of a difference huh? Do you have a good source for a good adjustable steel cam pulley?

I've also realized that I've made a stupid mistake...My car is a 72. I think i said 71 out of wishful thinking, but no, i have the emissions choked 72. What can I do to get a bit more out of the horse power hole on that one? Obviously the cam pulley. And upjet the holley 5200 a little on the mains I hear?

Allegedly the car came with a cam and better pistons, although i have not had the valve cover off to verify the cam yet. Any good ideas on how to verify the pistons? Apart from just removing the head obviously  ::)

The only things keeping me from driving the car everyday are:
1: the front break calipers still haven't been cleaned up/replaced
2: the suspension, in its current state, is so bouncy and wobbly its actually dangerous
3: I'm worried about hurting the engine with this oil pressure conundrum
4: The Left brake light wont come on.

I've addressed problems 1-3 with you guys. But was hoping problem 4 was just a broken filament on the left brake light. Well today i switched the right and left bulbs and the problem stayed on the left side of the car. Its weird because the running lights work on both the right and left, and well as the turn signals. However the brake lights and the emergency flashers only work on the right, not on the left.

Anybody got any ideas or knowledge about problem #4?

Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2019, 10:02:56 AM »
Like someone said before, the check valve in the oul filter may be faulty allowing the oul in the filter to drain back.

Once the pressire comes up how much pressure do you have at idle.and at 2000 rpm

A 2000 should have about 40 psi at 1100 rpm cold and 60 psi at 3000 cold

30 psi at 1100 and 45-50 psi at 3000 rpm hot with 25 50 oil

If the main bearings were worn it would probably knock.

If you are not getting at least 34-40psi oil pressure when the engine is running remove the cam cover and check to see that the cam is receiving oil.

2.0 engines have external cam spray bars that lubricate the cam lobes. If the holes in the spray bar plug or there isnt enough oil the cam will wear out quickly.

After running the engine till it is warm if you shut down the engine and remove the cam cover there should be oil pooled in the head below the cam

When the cam cover is removed if you start the engine oil will get flung everywhere.

Test the oil flow by just turning the starter, you should see oil flowing onto the cam lobes.

As.far as the turn signal, did you check the ground connection for the left brake light and turn signal, and make sure that the  outer shell.and contacts for the bulb are clean and shing so as to make good electrical contatct

Also make sure the outer shell and contacts on the bulb are  lean.

maybe add a second ground wire temporarily to check it

Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline Destroyasaur

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2019, 03:11:51 PM »
Well, when I changed the oil the  other day I put in a brand new wix filter and the oil pressure not building for about 10 seconds persisted, so I donít think itís a faulty check valve, as itís persited through 2 diferent oil filters. But who know, maybe I got another dud. Hopefully the fl1 will help.

I need to take the car out to get better numbers on oil pressure once it comes up. But Iíll get back to you on that.
Iíll take the valve cover off and check the cam Oiler when I get he chance.thats one of the big things Iíve been wanting to check. Good tip on just using the starter moter to check without making a mess

I know the ground for the bulb works as the running light turns on on the left when the headlight is on. But good thought on the connector for the brake light circuit on the housing maybe being dirty. Iíll check that next.

As for the cam timing gear, any sources when I can find an adjustable steel  cam timing gear?

I read your post about making an adjustable cam timeing pulley for the 2.0 engine. If I canít find a steel adjustable pulley, youíd recommend modifying the one I have instead of buying an aluminium unit?

As for the carb modifications you mentioned in that write up, you simply switched the mains jets from the secondary into the primary and then upjetted the secondary about 2 sizes correct?

Did you also open up the air box by adding more carb base gasketsas well? And did the former jet modifications account for the increased air flow?

And last question about getting a bit more power, you guys are usually running the base timing up to about 10 or 12  degrees correct?

Thanks again FordMan! Itís nice to have someone with some experience with the engines that I can bounce questions off of.

Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2019, 04:40:42 PM »
Heres a link to the cam pulley..

For the money its probably better to just invest in the adjustable one

https://www.burtonpower.com/kent-cams-adjustable-steel-cam-pulley-ford-sohc-pinto-ft310a.html

You can order one from Racer walsh, he has been racing pintos and selling parts since the 70s

Just make sure you mention that you want the steel one.

http://racerwalsh.com

Just call and ask for Brian.

As far as the factory webber carb..some folks cqn make them run ok but after fiddling with mine for a couple of years i gave up and built a manifold for 2 SU side drafts from a 72 MGB.

Made a world of difference in performance.

If you are really into performance the best simple carb upgrade is switching to a 350 or 500 cfm Ford 2bbl.

Thats the carb of choice for the circle racers.

Heres a pic of the carb setup i use.
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2019, 05:01:45 PM »
Heres a link to some pix of the Ford or Holley 350 or 500 cfm 2 barrels.

https://www.holley.com/products/fuel_systems/carburetors/performance_2_barrels/

The link is to see what they look like. Dont need to spend the money they are charging

The carbs were used on small to midsized Ford V8 engines fr9m the 50s to the 9ps so there are a lot of used and replacement ones around.

Do some research about what the model numbers mean and you can probably find a good used one at a swap meet or a rebuilt one.

Adapters are available to fit them to the pinto manifolds.
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2019, 12:44:20 AM »
Hi..

Any progress with your suspension or oil pressure
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles

Offline Destroyasaur

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2019, 01:23:25 AM »
So, the Gas adjust shocks are in, and the ride is much better! That being said, now that I can actually feel things while I'm driving, i can feel how loose the front end is, and there's a clunk when I'm braking. I went and shook the front wheels and as expected, looks like my control arm bushings are boned. So i gotta figure replacing those. Hopefully not too much else down there is real bad. Any suggestions on doing the job? Should i just go ahead and buy a kit that comes with the upper and lower bushings, ball joints, and everything? or just individually replace what I find bad?

Oil continues to not build pressure for about 10 seconds on startup. That being said, I have not tried the new FL1 Oil filter yet.

oil pressure at idle warm is only about 12 pounds
but as soon and i rev it it goes up to at least 45 pounds

I figure its probably not the worst as long as i don't rev it up a lot before I get oil pressure.

I have not yet gotten in contact with racer walsh about the adjustable cam pulley, but am looking forward to getting that one done. I'm betting it'll do a lot.

The Carb: i got tired of fighting the leaky, dirty, seriously incorrectly jetted holley 5200 i had, and just went ahead and bought a brand new weber 32/36. Everything runs much happier and smoother now. I'll want more performance soon, but for now I'd just like to drive the damn thing, and get a little reliability.

 That being said, the new weber did not have a port for the deceleration valve. I just put a vaccum cap over the port on the decel valve. Is that enough? Or do i actually have to remove the whole valve and plug the hole in the manifold. What are you guys doing when you do aftermarket carbs? Do you keep trying to run the decel valve? Or just nix it entirely?

As for the electric choke, i was getting 12 volts of switched power to my coil, so I just went ahead and spliced it in there. Not perfect as the choke will begin to warm up with the key on even if the engine isn't running, but it'll do for now. Any suggestions on a better place to pull 12 volts for the choke?

Also, my new air filter does not have a port for the hose that comes from the big pot next to the radiator on the drivers side. Charcoal canister? evap canister? Should I drill a hole into my new air filter and put a fitting on so I can route that hose back to my air filter? or should I just put a little air filter on it and call it a day?

For the brakes i rebuilt the Calipers and put on a manufactured brake master cylinder and everything feels a lot better! That being said, the brass adapter fittings that are between the brake lines and the master cylinder aren't making the best seal, as it's a little wet on the bottom of my master cylinder. I'm guessing the brass fittings are just old, or I over-tightened them a touch. Anyone happen to know the sizes on those? I was planning on pulling them off this weekend, and then driving around town until I found the right ones, but I'd much rather just order them online and save myself the trouble.

Brake lights work, though at the cost of my turn signals. The left hand brake light wire was not getting power all the way up to the connector that goes into the steering wheel, and that's when I stopped digging and just spliced the connector from the drivers side brake light into the passenger one that was working. The only downside being that now the turn signals make both sides of the car blink, not just one. I"ll figure it out and do it right a little later down the line, but for now I'd rather have brake lights that turn signals. That being said, if anyone has any ideas of where to check for for the wiring disconnect on the drivers side brake light, I am all ears.

Thant's all for now folks. Looking forward to hearing what you have to say!

Offline LongTimeFordMan

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Re: Suspension Overhaul
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2019, 03:17:08 AM »
Heres a link to a wiring diagram

http://www.gt40s.com/images/torino/72ford.pdf

It has info about there the connections are and what they look like.

The power wire to the  coil is a resistor wire and although it reads 12 v the current is limited and tapping into it for the choke heater may redire t too much power from the ignition system
 Why not just replace the electric choke with a manual cable.  They are available for about $10 at an auto parts store and you have more control and dont need to adjust it.

Download the wiring diagram linked above

Unfortunately pintos d9nt have a convenient place to tap into a switched 12v supply.

I solved this by tapping into the wiring harness under the dash near the connector on the left side of the steering column.

There are wires from both the ignition and accessory circuits there. The wire between that connector and the ign  coil is where the resistor wire is.

Ive included a photo of how to make the connections for ign and accessory power.

Not shown is a tap i added for accessory power. I used a female and male spade terminals to connect to the ign wire to enable easy changes if necessary.

The tap onto the ign wire is to.supply 12v to a pertronix unit if you install one.

 I also.added a fuse to the accessory circuit and would suggest that you use the fused power from the accessory circuit for everything except ign.

I will attach photos of the accessory tap and fuse.

As.far as the front end  did you check the tie rod ends and the play at the junction where the tie rods attach to the steering rack.  This joint tends to wear and cause play in the steering.

Also, make.sure.that the bolts that secure the bottom of the shocks are tightened. If they are just a  it loose the shock can shift and cause a thunk when braking or going over a bump.
Red 1973 pinto wagon DD, SoCal desert car, Factory 4 speed, 3.40 gears, Stock engine, 14" rims and tires, 60 K original miles