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Author Topic: PCV  (Read 2014 times)

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Offline lefty

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PCV
« on: February 01, 2012, 11:05:55 AM »
I am running a 1977 2.3 engine with NO emission Components--do I still have to run a PCV and if so where should I attach it to on my carb--I am running a FOMOCO series 21000 2bbl Carb ....

Offline waldo786

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Re: PCV
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2012, 07:47:37 PM »
I do believe I saw somewhere you could use a T connect and run it in where the brake line comes out of the manifold.  I found it in a search when I was doing some looking around about how some esslinger equipment would work on my car since they say they don't use the emission-s stuff.  A google search may yield some results as that's what I did.

Offline Jessi

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Re: PCV
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2012, 08:39:59 AM »
The PCV valve is not as important as what it represents. As an engine runs you get some amount of blow by (gases blowing past the piston rings into the crankcase). In a perfectly sealed engine, with no ventilation, the crankcase can pressurize till it reaches a point that the gaskets blow. Usually this would be the valve cover gasket. The more wear on the engine the more likely blow by will occur. That being said, this problem has existed as long as engines have. Before PCV valves they used a filtered breather that allowed air to flow in and out with little resistance. It let the engine breathe so to speak. You commonly find these styles of breathers in the dress up section at automotive stores. Later, when emissions came into play, it was decided that these blow by gases contribute to the environmental problems that we have. So it was decided to put this PCV valve system in to allow these gases to go back where they came from, since these gases tend to be high in Hydrocarbons.

So that's what its for. Do you need a PCV valve? No, but you need a ventilation system of some kind, and if you choose to forgo the PCV, and go open ventilation make sure the system is filtered. Personally I choose to run a filtered breather on one side and a PCV valve system on the other (the vacuum creates a draft to pull gases out of the PCV and fresh air in the filtered breather). I do this because it doesn't hurt performance in the least bit, and it helps the environment. Win, win for me. Not to say that the rest of my emissions stuff isn't gone too, cause they are.

As far as where to plug it? I use a constant source of vacuum, mine is a port on the manifold itself (normally used for a brake booster, but mine has manual brakes). Plugging it into the booster vacuum with a T like mentioned above should work fine. No matter where you plug it just make sure it is a direct line to the manifold  between the carb and cylinder. If you plug it into a vacuum port directly on the carb it will lead to issues as the air from the crankcase is DIRTY! That is why PCV valves have to be replaced on a regular basis. In fact if you go the "T" route put it as close to the vacuum source as possible, and clean it out when you change you PCV at tuneup intervals.

Hope this helps
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Offline lefty

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Re: PCV
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2012, 08:06:08 PM »
thanks for all your help-get it squared away....thanks again!!