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Offline butch martin

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carb jet placement
« on: July 19, 2013, 10:10:19 AM »
i have a 76 wagon with a 2.3L and 4 speed trans . i disassembled the carb for rebuild and am sorta confused about the correct placement of the jets and emulsion tubes . seems all the larger # jets were on the primary side . is this one of those odd carbs where the primary side takes the larger jets . can someone give me the correct placement of the jets , emulsion tubes and air jets . the carb is an R7322 . and what is actually called ? a holly or a weber  ?

thanks ,
butch martin
saucier . ms.

Offline 289Wagon

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2013, 11:54:04 AM »
Hope this helps
Still living the dream...In a points & condenser world.

Offline jeremysdad

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2013, 12:05:04 PM »
You may have a carb that has been previously modified. Since these 5200's (Holley-branded Weber design, if that helps) don't take your available-everywhere standard Holley jet, a fairly common trick is to take the secondary jet and put it in the primary side, then drill the primary side out bigger than the original secondary for use as the new larger secondary. I haven't messed with mine (don't have a numbered drill bit set)(and I like my mileage...bad enough with the 3 speed, it doesn't need help lol).

I can't remember which emulsion tubes/air bleeds/etc were where on mine, that's been a year or more ago that I had it torn apart. I do remember that stock, the smaller sizes are primary side for the jets and such. Ymmv.

Edit to add: Here's a link to a good pdf manual out of an old rebuild kit or something. Way better than what comes in the new kits. Still not a spec for orifice sizes, I'm looking through all my bookmarks, as I found that somewhere before. Anyway, manual: http://www.thesamba.com/vw/archives/manuals/holley_carburetor/Holley_5200_Carburetor.pdf

Offline 289Wagon

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2013, 12:05:24 PM »
(1) R7322 sounds like a rebuilt part # and not the actual part ID. (2) there were 14 different carb used on the '76 2.3 (3) It seems they were all Holley's (4) They all list the primary jet to be the 'smaller' one.
 Can't say anything for sure. Who knows what someone may have put on over the years.
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Offline butch martin

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2013, 11:58:36 PM »
thanks to all who replyed . the jet #'s correspond with the size . meaning the larger # has a larger hole than the smaller # with a smaller hole . so i believe the jets have not been modifyed . according to the rebuild kit instructions the r7322 is a 76 model carb . this # is stamped on the carb base . no tag to be found with an ID # . also kinda confusing is this carb has a brass float which does not show up in any info you and i have found . so setting the float with the settings furnished with the rebuild kit may not be correct ????? so i'll use the old rule of thumb and set the float level . still undescided about how the drop float level setting . i will put the jets back to what would be normal with the smaller ones to the primary side . ill let you all know how it turns out probably on sunday .

thanks again for the help .

butch martin
saucier , ms.

Offline amc49

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2013, 01:26:22 AM »
An 'R' and four digit number following is the actual HOLLEY part number, not Ford, which would be on the tag, or often lost. The R number is always on the base.

AND, although conventional wisdom says the smaller jet goes in the smaller hole, sometimes that is not true. It depends on how much air is metered through the fuel circuit, you can have a bigger jet and flow less fuel if the airjet is bigger, or if more holes in the emulsion tubes. Depends on what the carb engineer is trying to do, they may put a lot of air in one to make the circuit do something they want. Like hitting emissions at some certain point in the rpm band.

Yes, I know it's late but thought I'd bring this public service bulletin...... ........

Offline rramjet

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2013, 12:10:11 PM »
I found an Esslinger tech sheet that recommends moving the Seconday jet to the Primary and then drilling the Primary jet two sizes bigger than the one that came from the Secondary and putting it into the Secondary side.

Anyone ever try this?

Offline jeremysdad

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2013, 12:50:03 PM »
I found an Esslinger tech sheet that recommends moving the Seconday jet to the Primary and then drilling the Primary jet two sizes bigger than the one that came from the Secondary and putting it into the Secondary side.

Anyone ever try this?

No, but I did the drill bit size conversions (involves, as I recall, the lettered set and numbered set), then decided that as important as flow characteristic s are to carb function, a jetting kit was a better option. That is a task that you better have a steady hand to accomplish properly. ;)

Offline 74 PintoWagon

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2013, 01:56:20 PM »
Jets are flowed and any time you drill a jet you disrupt flow and it can go both ways, I remember a friend of mine back in the 80's cooked a motor in his dragster from drilling jets, he was running lean and he drilled them out one size and made a pass and the car ran faster it fattened up, looked at the plugs and it was still a tad lean so he drilled them out one more size, made a pass and got 3/4 track and that was it melted 3 pistons, so he took them in and had them flowed they were 2 sizes smaller than they originally were, big lesson learned there.
Art
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Offline amc49

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2013, 10:29:44 PM »
That really only applies to bigger holes, the drillbit cuts swirls in the hole that throw off flow. On smaller holes I do it all the time and have never gotten anything less than the bigger fuel desired. I hand drill all holes not with an electric drill. Done it hundreds of times on motorcycles. Have done it on Pinto idle jets as well. I also run the jet further up on the bit to the blank portion and burnish the hole a bit.

I wouldn't be so sure the jets are flowed either, if they are not green tinted they are not.

I don't prefer to drill but when you have no parts......... .............. ...why I used to pull all Pinto jets at the junkyard back in the day.

Offline 74 PintoWagon

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2013, 07:58:25 AM »
Well, it's not necessarily the hole size(look at standard Holley jets)it's the chamfer that controls most of the flow and when you drill out a jet the chamfer changes and so does the flow, of course the bigger the jet the more of a change you get, drill bit is a drill bit no matter what size and small or big still cuts swirls, only thing I'll drill is squirters. But hey, to each his own if it works more power to ya..

I've had jets flowed before and a whole bunch of injector pills flowed and none ever came back with a green tint, that's new to me????...
Art
65 Falcon 2DR 200 IL6 with C4.

Offline amc49

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Re: carb jet placement
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2013, 12:27:12 AM »
Holley jets for at least for a while there were green tinted to show they were actually matched almost exactly for flow, all others were NOT, they fell into a much bigger range of variance. Many jets I've played with have no chamfer at all, the chamfer becomes a problem in itself an added machine operation to tilt the result. If not flowed you then have to question the chamfer as well. Length of the hole affects flow too, even with same size hole. Just like a full size head port, the hole hates highspots hanging in it more than lows, or why I burnish using the blank drill portion. Forgot to say that while doing it I turn the opposite direction of cutting as well. I remove bit from hole turning backwards as well. Don't be in hurry or push hard either when cutting, slower less pressure cutting swirls less just like at the machine shop. Swirl happens when cutting edge gets loaded up with material to overcut, slow down and it doesn't do it nearly as bad. Pull out bit and clean it couple times as well. Most is in the technique.